Kinsa Group Blog

Kinsa Finds The Ideal Quality Candidate for Iconic Food Brand

November 24th, 2014

Our client, a recognized world leader in the restaurant category, sought Kinsa’s recruiting assistance for a contingency search for their critical Director of Global Quality & Food Safety need. They needed a talented professional with experience leading QA teams in the QSR industry or for a global iconic food brand. They also desired experience working directly with franchisees.

Kinsa designed our recruiting campaign to attract a talented professional with excellent corporate experience within the restaurant category, capable of driving quality through a global organization.  Within the first week of Kinsa’s recruiting efforts, multiple candidates were identified and recruited for the role.  The Top Talent our client selected was submitted 5 days after launch.  Kinsa’s recruiter had this to say with his resume submittal, “Sr. Director of Quality in charge of 950 units nationally and 400 units internationally. He’s held Director of Total Quality, Sr. Total Quality Manager, and Total Quality Manager for [two major restaurant chains].

He was immediately scheduled for phone interviews with HR and the Sr. VP hiring manager the following week.  A month following his resume submission he was visiting with our client at their headquarters in the upper Midwest USA for a face-to-face interview.  The candidate was actively employed but excited about the opportunity to relocate his family closer to their extended family and friends in a neighboring state.

After speaking to the candidate about his supply chain and total quality experiences, he was selected by our client as the ideal candidate.  An offer was made within 2 weeks of the face-to-face interview and accepted the following day.  A success—just 45 days from identifying the candidate to accepted offer!  Our client said, “Thanks to both of you for landing us an ACE. [We] are really happy and think he is perfect for what we need. You were great to work with – definitely will be using you in the future.”  About 45 days later our client reached back out to say, “I have another job for you because… A) I miss you, and B) the candidate was a great hire!”

Need to grow your team?

Trust Kinsa Group with your next food & beverage search. Whether you’re looking for a C-level executive, a quality assurance professional or a sales leader, we offer a variety of search packages designed to deliver the best and brightest talent for you.  Please contact me at laurieh@kinsa.com to discuss your particular need!

Kinsa Group – Top Talent – Quality & Regulatory Manager – Dairy – IL

November 20th, 2014

Top Talent is Kinsa Group’s listing of currently available food and beverage industry professionals that you as an employer may interview and hire at a reduced fee.  The following food and beverage industry professionals are experienced, motivated and ready to perform for your organization.

Quality & Regulatory Manager – Dairy – IL

Featuring a Corporate Quality Manager:

– Chemical Engineering educational background coupled with corporate-level quality assurance management experience for the past ten years with two different Fortune 500 companies.

– Implemented quality and food safety programs across more than fifteen facilities for a major dairy manufacturer.

– Eager to move into a corporate quality management role with a manufacturer in the Chicago area!

Contact me to schedule an interview with this candidate or learn about other talent that may match your current needs.

For more information on this top talent please contact Laurie Hyllberg at laurieh@kinsa.com

6 Steps for Auditing Your Company’s Candidate Experience

November 17th, 2014

Positive Candidate Experience 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sharlyn Lauby, experienced HR consultant/HR Bartender blog creator, offers these six steps for auditing your company’s candidate experience.

A positive candidate experience provides organizations with a competitive advantage in two ways. First, from a revenue perspective. The last thing any company wants is to say “no” to a candidate and lose a customer. The business world is way too competitive to lose a customer over a negative hiring experience.

Second is competitive advantage in terms of the War for Talent. As organizations continue to struggle with finding the most qualified candidates, no company can afford to lose top talent because of a poor candidate experience.

Now at this point, you might be asking how widespread the poor candidate experience is. I must admit, the number is bigger than I imagined. According to iCIMS research, 46 percent of candidates rate their candidate experience as poor to very poor. Basically, half of companies have a bad candidate experience. Wow. Half! So how does an organization determine where they are on the scale? By auditing their candidate experience. Here’s a list of six things you can do to see how your organization fares.

1. Social Recruitment. Take a critical eye to your company’s social recruitment efforts. Look at those places where you have a social presence (i.e. LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook) and review your profile, posting history, responses, etc. Does the company profile accurately reflect the business? Are there links back to the company career site? Is the site being maintained or was the last post six months ago? Are candidate questions being answered? If you’re too close to the social recruiting strategy, ask a manager to check it out and give you their honest opinion. They have a vested interest in taking a few moments to do this. After all, they want good candidates for their job openings.

2. Career Sites. Ask a friend or family member who doesn’t look at your career site every day to visit your career portal and search for a job. Don’t send them a link; allow them to locate and use your site the way a candidate would. Then find out how easy (or difficult) the site was to navigate. Don’t want to take work home and ask a family member? Ask a colleague and offer to return the favor. Develop five quick questions for them to answer about the ease of navigating the site on a scale of 1-5.

3. Applications. The human resources department should time themselves to determine how long it takes to fill out the company application online. I’ve heard HR directors say they attempted this activity and gave up trying to complete their own company application. If that’s true, can you imagine how frustrated a candidate gets? Also, try to upload your LinkedIn profile to apply.

4. Mobile Devices. Speaking of applying for jobs, it seems like everyone today has some sort of mobile device. Check out your career site on a mobile device and try to apply for a job. Time how long the process takes both when you immediately know the job you’re applying for as well as when you search for a job and then apply.

5. Candidate Communications. Probably the biggest complaint from candidates is that they never hear about the status of their application. Many companies are addressing this issue by creating response “rules”. Marie Artim, vice president of talent acquisition at Enterprise Holdings, says their standard for responding to candidates is five days. If your company has a response standard, it should be easy to confirm that the standard is being maintained. I know I’ve run into situations where the HR department gets crazy busy and standards get stretched (if ya know what I mean). Regular monitoring makes sure candidate communications remain a priority.

6. New Hire Feedback. Go straight to the source. Ask new hires to complete a quick survey after orientation. You can set this up in an onboarding software solution to be sent at a certain time. The results can be submitted confidentially. This is a perfect time while the process is still fresh in their mind.

Honestly, none of these audit items are hard. Yes, they do take planning, dedication, and some effort. But it’s exactly that dedication that ensures your organization will end up on the right half of the candidate experience scale. The companies that care about the candidate experience make creating and monitoring their efforts a priority.

Kinsa Group – Top Talent – Sr. Director Product Innovation & Technology

November 13th, 2014

Top Talent is Kinsa Group’s listing of currently available food and beverage industry professionals that you as an employer may interview and hire at a reduced fee.  The following food and beverage industry professionals are experienced, motivated and ready to perform for your organization.

Sr. Director Product Innovation & Technology – Beverage

Senior technical leader, with strong academic training and nearly 20 years of proven track record in developing portfolio of novel technologies and product, package and process innovations seeking Sr. Director, Product Innovation , Technology roles in CPG Food and Beverage.  Specialized training in leading applied research, developing high performing teams, using external (open) innovation, partner collaborations, and developing strategy. Experiences in nutrition, regulatory, ingredient, shelf life, sensory, snacks, frozen meals, pet food, flavors, distillation, packaging, and spirits. Open to relocating nationwide.

 

For more information on this top talent, please contact Mary Chambers at maryc@kinsa.com

The Best Food & Beverage Talent May Already be Working for You! Tips for identifying “hidden superstars” in your organization

November 10th, 2014

high potential employeeWhere will you find your organization’s next great executive or professional?

With talent markets tightening up, many food & beverage employers are looking internally to fill available positions. And with good reason.

The truth is, the best food & beverage talent may already be on your team. The trick is identifying which individuals are truly “high potential” – possessing the latent abilities to thrive in a more challenging role.

How can you find these “hidden superstars” within your organization? Today, Kinsa provides advice to help you identify team members with the desire and ability to perform at the next level:

Understand the difference between performance and potential. High performers are easy to spot. They consistently exceed expectations, have a track record of success and are the “go-to” choices for tough projects. High potentials, however, can be much more difficult to identify for several reasons:

  • They’re highly skilled, but their abilities have not been “put to the test” because they may be assigned to the wrong roles.
  • They are altruistic and have high emotional intelligence, but may be too humble (or not know how) to adequately self-promote.
  • Your current performance appraisal system may not adequately gauge potential.

Look for these core competencies. Potential is as much about character attributes and “soft skills” as it is about actual performance. When identifying high potential, consider the following list of key indicators:

  • Character. Values align with the organization; passionate about the industry; role model for company culture.
  • Personality. Strong interpersonal and social skills; resilient; persistent; emotionally stable.
  • Learning. Flexible; accepting of feedback; rapid learner.
  • Motivation. Aspires to higher level of responsibility; tolerance for risk-taking; career- and results-oriented.
  • Leadership. Ability to manage, inspire, lead and develop people; challenges the status quo.
  • Performance. Results-oriented; exceeds expectations; develops creative solutions.
  • Knowledge. Technical/functional skills and knowledge.

Develop objective, reliable methods to assess not just performance, but potential. Traditional performance appraisals focus more on results than on identifying potential. Adapt your processes to include clear criteria for assessing potential. Include the behaviors, soft skills, achievements and performance indicators that equate to high potential for each key role.

Need to grow your team?

Trust Kinsa Group with your next executive food & beverage search. Our recruiting professionals are experts at identifying high potential employees who will perform well in your organization.  Whether you’re looking for a C-level executive, a quality assurance professional or a food technologist, we offer a variety of search and assessment services to deliver the best and brightest for you.

Related Posts

How Food & Beverage Employers Can Identify High Performers

Tips to Retain High Performers in Food & Beverage Organizations

 

Kinsa Group – Top Talent – Key Account Manager – Bakery

November 6th, 2014

Top Talent is Kinsa Group’s listing of currently available food and beverage industry professionals that you as an employer may interview and hire at a reduced fee.  The following food and beverage industry professionals are experienced, motivated and ready to perform for your organization.

Key Account Manager – Bakery 

Featuring a Regional Retail Sales Manager with 12 years of experience in a Fortune 500 Company in the Packaged Foods / CPG industry in Account Management, Category Management, and Field Execution managing a sales team.

– She has been promoted 3 times within the company due to her stellar performance and leadership skills.

– She has relationships with large key account customers such as Ahold, Publix, Walmart and Winn Dixie.

– This candidate has an MBA and is a top performer receiving the highest annual review ratings.

– Looking to progress to National Account Management, Lead a Category Management or Business Development team and is located in the Miami/Ft. Lauderdale market.

Please contact me if you’d like to review a resume or set up a conversation.  Don’t let this top talent get away!

For more information on this top talent please contact Laurie Hyllberg at laurieh@kinsa.com

Beware of the Counteroffer: What it Really Says . . .

November 3rd, 2014

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Don Charlton explains why counter offers may work for professional athletes but not in the workplace. 

Think about it: an employee successfully went through the process of finding, interviewing, and accepting a new job, only to be pulled back in by the company they already committed to leaving. It may make you ask, “Should I make a counteroffer?”

We’ve talked about instances in which it might actually be beneficial to have employees who are motivated by money, but this isn’t one of them. Whether their reason is salary, position, a better company, or sheer boredom, there are very few instances, if any, when a counter offer should be made–or accepted.

The reality is even if a counter offer is accepted, the employee will soon fall back into the funnel of unhappiness or doubt that originally caused him to look for a new job. More often than not, the offer just delays the inevitable.

What does a counter offer truly say from an employer?

“Hey, you know what? You called our bluff! We have been underpaying you for years. You are truly worth a lot more than we are currently paying you, so let’s make this right.”

“We understand your frustrations. This $20k increase in your pay will make those frustrations disappear.”

“Now that we have “committed” to you as a vital cog in our organization’s success, we expect you to up your game. You didn’t expect that $20k raise to come without more responsibilities did you? You owe us!”

What accepting a counteroffer truly says about the employee.

“For sale!”

“I’m going to go with whoever makes me the best deal! Their commitment to me doesn’t matter.”

“I’m probably going to do it to you, too! Each day without a raise starts the clock ticking!”

What does giving a counter offer tell your co-workers?

“Wait a second–two days ago, that guy was hacked off and out the door. Now he’s walking into a bigger office with a bigger smile? Gee, I wonder what could have happened. . .”

“The only way to get a raise around here is to threaten to leave.”

“That guy gets $10k more than me, so shouldn’t I have to do $10k less work? Or should I just tell them I got a better offer?”

Sounds bad, right? Here’s the alternative. Great employees don’t act randomly. They’re too talented, and in too much demand for that. Instead of scratching and clawing to keep them, ask yourself: “Why is this super-talented person leaving my company? And how can I stop it from happening again?”

The effects of counter offers–even juicy ones–are temporary. Bad workplaces are much longer-term. Put the $20k to good use and invest in your current employees. Use the savings to invest in the employees that deserve to be invested in.

Simply put: counter offers may work for professional athletes, but leave them out of the office! What are your thoughts on counter offers? Comment below.

Kinsa Group – Top Talent – Quality & Food Safety Manager – Pet Food

October 30th, 2014

Top Talent is Kinsa Group’s listing of currently available food and beverage industry professionals that you as an employer may interview and hire at a reduced fee.  The following food and beverage industry professionals are experienced, motivated and ready to perform for your organization.

Quality & Food Safety Manager – Pet Food

Experienced Quality Manager with a vast knowledge of the food manufacturing industry with 20 years of experience. Experience in regulatory compliance requirements, HACCP, ISO 22000 programs, Continuous Process Improvement, wrote, trained and implemented GMPs, SOPs, audits with regulatory agencies, third party audits, customers and suppliers. Coordinated and developed positive relationships with cross-functional teams. BS Nutritional Science (Dietetics)

Directed the manufacturing site to a compliant audit rating. Manage the Quality System maintaining the utmost accuracy, Quality Specifications, reviewed and updated 25 to 50 product specifications a year. Worked with the lab staff, production, supply chain and purchasing. Managed audit functions conducted 15 to 20 successful audits per year from, Federal, State and Local agency, as well as Customers and Suppliers. Third Party auditor Silliker with audits in the high 90’s at all facilities.

Experienced as Quality Manager would be able to step in and successfully manage your quality specification systems, using my knowledge of the food industry to manage your regulatory compliance requirements, your manufacturing sites HACCP, ISO 22000 programs, Continuous Process Improvement to make improvements in the plant, write, train and implemented GMPs and SOPs. Conducted plant audits with regulatory agencies, third party audits, customers and suppliers. Coordinated and developed positive relationships with cross-functional teams.

 

For more information on this top talent please contact Nancy Furgason at nancyf@kinsa.com

Optimize Your Operations Manager – Food Production Resume

October 27th, 2014

production lineWant to know exactly what a recruiter wants to see on your food & beverage Operations or Production resume?

You don’t need a crystal ball or the ability to read minds; all you need is good information.

And you’ll find it right here.

Today, we continue our series of resume optimization posts, each dedicated to a specific professional job category within the food & beverage industry.

Earlier this year, our recruiters shared what they and their clients look for in Food & Beverage Supply Chain / Logistics resumes, as well as Food & Beverage Quality and Food Safety resumes. Today, a Kinsa recruiter explains how to optimize your Plant Operations Manager – Food Production resume – so it stands out and showcases your talent:

From Robert Navarro – Senior Recruiting Consultant:

  • Company and market description. For each employer, create a brief description of the company. Don’t assume that your reader knows who they are or what they do.
  • Product category per position/employer. For each position you’ve held, include the food or beverage product(s) you produced at that particular plant.
  • Direct supervisor. Include the title of the individual to whom you reported.
  • Employees managed. List the size of your staff and the titles of your direct reports.
  • Plant specifics. Detail the size of the plant (either in number of employees or square feet), the number of production lines in the plant and operating shift(s) you oversaw.
  • Measurable accomplishments. Not surprisingly, the best resumes include specific information on how the candidate saved money, increased efficiency and minimized downtime. Wherever possible, translate your accomplishments into hard numbers to support your achievements.
  • Other responsibilities. Include a description of any other duties you performed or managed, such as sanitation, quality and/or maintenance functions.
  • Keywords. If applicable, incorporate the following terms throughout your resume:
    • Operations
    • Plant Manager
    • Production
    • Lean Manufacturing (if you have it and any related processes)
    • GMP’s [Good Manufacturing Practices]
    • HACCP [Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points]
    • Plant SQF Certification and the corresponding level [Safe Quality Food]
    • Food Safety
    • OSHA safety record/successes
    • Other key audits or certifications for your facility like AIB [American Institute of Baking]
    • P&L [profit and loss responsibility]
    • Food Processing
    • High-Speed Processing (if applicable)

Kinsa Group – Top Talent – Sales Director – Shelf-Stable Foods

October 23rd, 2014

Top Talent is Kinsa Group’s listing of currently available food and beverage industry professionals that you as an employer may interview and hire at a reduced fee.  The following food and beverage industry professionals are experienced, motivated and ready to perform for your organization.

Sales Director – Shelf-Stable Foods  

Successful  Central US sales director with 15 years of experience in different categories and different channels (Value Discount, Drug and C-store). Offers wide-range of experience building winning relationships and strategic business plans. Over the past two years, has grown the value discount business by almost 11%, through fact-based selling, consumer insights and understanding the customers goals.  Experienced with major food CPG products and companies.

 

For more information on this top talent please contact Nancy Furgason at nancyf@kinsa.com


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